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The Paleo diet is abounding in nutrients that help maintain healthy bones and teeth. It also avoids the foods that rob your body of bone-strengthening minerals. This real food diet helps you steer clear of tooth decay, gum disease, and low bone density, and can even reverse these conditions once they start.

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The Paleo Diet is Rich in Essential Fat Soluble Vitamins

Vitamins A, D, and K2 are essential fat soluble vitamins. K2 is needed to activate a protein that adds calcium and phosphorus to the bones and teeth. This protein is produced only in the presence of vitamins A and D.

Without fat soluble vitamins, your risk of calcific atherosclerosis increases. Proteins activated by K2 keep calcium from embedding into the soft tissue of your arteries.

Studies show that those who choose raw vegan diets increase their risk of tooth erosion. Beta carotene is a beneficial antioxidant, but it isn’t an efficient source of vitamin A. Plant-based K1 is entirely different from K2, and can’t do the job of activating vital proteins.

The Paleo Diet is Free of Depleting Grains

The Paleo diet cuts out grains, which are high in phytic acid. Phytic acid is a toxin in a plant’s natural defense system. It pulls calcium and magnesium from the body, leaving you depleted in these important minerals.

Grains are acidic foods. They increase your body’s pH, causing it to neutralize the blood by taking calcium from stores in the bones. This demineralizing effect is an important factor in reduced bone density.

The acid load caused by meat is partially balanced by stimulating the hormone insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). This hormone generates bone growth and mineralization. A meal that combines pastured meat and fresh vegetables helps to keep the body from becoming acidic.

The Paleo Diet Removes Blood-Sugar Boosting Refined Carbohydrates

Diabetes triples your risk of tooth decay and gum disease. This metabolic disease is the result of a chain of events that begins with the diet.

Foods like wheat flour, sugar, and processed grains quickly elevate blood glucose (sugar) levels. The hormone insulin is produced in order to bring these levels down to normal. When this occurs consistently, more insulin is required to normalize blood glucose. This is called insulin resistance. When the body isn’t able to produce enough insulin to meet the demand, type 2 diabetes is the result.

Insulin resistance affects other glands, causing a hormonal imbalance that depletes your body of nutrients. For instance, out-of-control blood glucose causes the pituitary gland to leach phosphorus from the bones and teeth.

The Paleo diet avoids–and even reverses–Insulin resistance and diabetes by including whole, natural foods and avoiding refined and processed foods.

Todays diets are low in fat soluble vitamins and high in acidic, mineral-absorbing foods that contribute to tooth decay, gum disease, and reduced bone mineral density. Choosing a Paleo diet helps you to avoid these common nutrition-related disorders.

Resources:

Nagel, Ramiel. Cure Tooth Decay: Remineralize Cavities & Repair Your Teeth Naturally with Good Food. Los Gatos, CA: Golden Child Pub., 2011. Print.

Touger-Decker, R. “Position of the American Dietetic Association Oral Health and Nutrition.” Journal of the American Dietetic Association 96.2 (1996): 184-89. Print.

Ganss, C., M. Schlechtriemen, and J. Klimek. “Dental Erosions in Subjects Living on a Raw Food Diet.” Caries Research 33.1 (1999): 74-80. Print.

Emrich, Lawrence J., Marc Shlossman, and Robert J. Genco. “Periodontal Disease in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.” Journal of Periodontology 62.2 (1991): 123-31. Print.…